Eros and the Life of the Theologian, 2

I suppose that it is time for me to define my keyword. Even though my definition is derived from Plato, it is not identical with his definition. Now, Socrates draws attention to the genealogy of the person of Eros, who is the son of Penia (poverty) and Poros (resource). Socrates says that due to his mother’s influence Eros is always living in need. However, because of his father, Eros is “a schemer after the beautiful and the good (Sym 203d).” Likewise, lowercase eros—the eros of human experience—has this same dual nature. The philosopher (and the theologian) are ultimately schemers after the beautiful and the good. Moreover, the philosopher and the theologian lack these basic resources. Socrates decides that “eros is wanting to possess the good for ever.” Moreover, eros wants “reproduction and birth in beauty.” However, some are pregnant in body and some are pregnant in soul. In other words, some focus on physical beauty and others on metaphysical beauty.

This is part of why I think that modern Christians should be skilled in erotic love. For Christians should recognize their lack and become schemers after the beautiful and the good. For, Christ is both our ultimate lack and the ultimate object of erotic desire for the Church.

Comments
2 Responses to “Eros and the Life of the Theologian, 2”
  1. mjjhoskin says:

    I like this idea, that the theologian should be a schemer after the beautiful and the good. We should be desiring it highly, filled with eros for the beautiful and the good. Theology is not merely an academic pursuit or an abstract wandering through highly technical language, but a desire for beauty and truth.

  2. dion says:

    There is something sick and true about all this.

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